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Tuesday, 26 December 2017 00:00

Nail Salons and Fungal Infections

According to a recent Rutgers University study in the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, 52 percent of people who visited a nail salon three times in a year had suffered from a skin infection.  There are a number of reasons why this might be.  Improperly cleaned tools, harsh chemicals like formaldehyde, UV light exposure, or an infected environment all put nail salon patrons at risk for infections.  Common infections include athlete’s foot, toenail fungus, contact dermatitis, and even hepatitis in some cases.  A number of responders to the study also reported suffering from respiratory conditions after going to a salon as well.  If you would still like to go to a nail salon, make sure they properly sterilize their tools, and avoid anything that contains harsh chemicals.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack from Advantage Foot Care Centers.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 18 December 2017 00:00

How to Deal with Corns and Calluses

Corns and calluses are areas where the skin has hardened, generally due to friction and pressure. This friction usually stems from footwear and socks; to help prevent them from forming, wear shoes that have enough room for your feet and aren’t cramped. Over-the-counter chemical peels can remove either corns or calluses at the risk of potentially damaging skin. Pumice stones can be used to remove corns and calluses but can also damage skin. If you are a diabetic, do not attempt to remove either one and instead see a podiatrist. Overall, podiatrists can treat corns and calluses in ways that do not risk harm to your feet.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack of Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What are they? And how do you get rid of them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 12 December 2017 00:00

How the Foot is Structured

The relationship between the foot and the lower leg in motion is called foot biomechanics. When the foot is structured correctly, routine activities such as walking and running should typically occur without pain. The foot and ankle combine flexibility with support, providing functions that include shock absorption of one's body weight. Additionally, this part of the body acts as a lever during the push-off period before taking a step. There are 26 bones located in the foot and ankle; these bones are maintained by ligaments and tendons, helping the arches “give” when weight is placed on the foot. Functions of the arches include supporting the weight of the body while standing. The structure of the foot is anatomically linked, resulting in even distribution throughout the foot during weight-bearing activities.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack from Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics
-  Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
-  In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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While suffering a foot injury is no fun, recovery does not mean you should leap headfirst back into physical activity. It is recommended to slowly ease back into running or any sport after you have recovered from a previous injury. It is important to continue the rehabilitation regime prescribed to you to ensure that your foot heals properly. Furthermore, do not push yourself hard when you start running again, as you may not have fully recovered. Try to only run a few days a week once your podiatrist says it’s okay. Be sure to stretch before and after a run. Icing may help as well; however, this may not always be the case. Be sure to consult with a podiatrist before engaging in any kind of treatment protocol. Above all, stay positive and be patient, as getting back into any sport after an injury can be a trying task.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Warren Pasternack of Advantage Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in East Brunswick, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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